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Has anyone tried the Black Widow motorcycle ramp? I am thinking about buying the 10 ft model to ride my Deuce into the back of my pick m up. Is it scary to ride up the ramp? Does it move, sag, or bend when going up, and how about taking it down. Are the front brakes enough to hold the bike and stop it as you go down. Hate to invest $400 and not be comfortable using it.
 

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40 in wide will allow you to put down your feet. The first few times you use it, make sure to have help, you don't want to panic. I remember riding a Suzuki 370 into the back of a pick up, using a 2x10 for a ramp. That is scary, but if you can put your feet down, it is a lot easier. I have never done it with a streetbike.
 

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alleghenyrose said:
Are the front brakes enough to hold the bike and stop it as you go down?
No! When unloading, have the engine stopped and the trans in first gear, use the clutch to act as the rear brake. It works 'backward' from the brake lever of course, but its necessary. I've not used the ramp you're talking about but I do load the RK frequently with a too-short ramp. The ten footer should be the way to go. The trickiest bit is backing down and making the transition at the bottom...cuz there's a span created by the angle of the ramp that makes it impossible to touch anything with your feet. You have to plan ahead for that part!
 

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I have seen these and they look good never used though. Suggestion, maybe look into one that puts weight on the trailer hitch receiver instead of tailgate. It has an arm that goes underneath tailgate and slides into hitch receiver. Just a thought.
 

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masstch said:
No! When unloading, have the engine stopped and the trans in first gear, use the clutch to act as the rear brake. It works 'backward' from the brake lever of course, but its necessary.
I'll have to try that. :thanks:
Yesterday, I dropped my bike as I came off my trailer ramp, too fast, and used the front brake. :badmood:
 

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GrampsWyatt said:
I have seen these and they look good never used though. Suggestion, maybe look into one that puts weight on the trailer hitch receiver instead of tailgate. It has an arm that goes underneath tailgate and slides into hitch receiver. Just a thought.
That's a good suggestion...if you wanna keep yer tailgate in good shape, that's a lot of lever with a 700+ bike on it...
 

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masstch said:
When unloading, have the engine stopped and the trans in first gear, use the clutch to act as the rear brake. It works 'backward' from the brake lever of course, but its necessary. I
masstch,
:thanks: for a great tip.
I tried it, today, and had a much less eventful trip down the ramp. :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Excellent suggestions all

I want to thank everyone for the suggestions, especially MASSTCH for the tranny tip. So are you sitting on the bike when unloading it, or standing along side the bike. Sitting sounds more scary than standing along side the bike?
 

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It depends on the situation (ramp width/angle,etc).
What I do:
My ramp is an ATV ramp that is too short for the job at 6'. I have to look around to find a suitable high curb or such to unload to (or load from) .
Its a matter of how close I can get to the proper height, but I virtually always unload the bike by sitting on it. I have to give it a lot of thought before starting out so I don't end up stuck in the middle somewhere with a strap hung up or some such! I do it like this if the angles are not too extreme. Extreme angles mean that I have to walk it down, because the frame drags at the top of the ramp and the "air time" at the bottom is prolonged but I really try to avoid this. I have even had the occassion of unloading to a loading dock that was slightly higher than my truck...sitting on the bike was not possible as I couldn't push it up hill that way.
I would think a ten foot ramp would be just right, but haven't tried one.
NOTE: Never use a narrow ramp! The ramp should be wide enough that you can put your feet down on it while on the bike. If you must use two narrow ramps pushed together, use Vise-Grips to keep them together.

When riding it down, the "end of the world" is waiting for you during the air time. That's the part where the bike is partially on the ramp and partially on the ground while rolling backwards with you on it and your legs are too short to touch anything at that point. This is your candlestick moment, no stopping allowed! (Jack be nimble...) The more extreme angles make this air time longer and more difficult. When riding down, this part must be done quickly. When walking down, this part must be done very slowly!
The clutch helps here because you can stand on the left side and just ease it down the ramp...the difficulty of course is that if it starts to lean away from you, there's not much you can do about it, and that's for the whole process, not just the airtime portion.

In general, I like riding it down because I'm in total control during the whole thing Except for the air time part.

When I'm walking the bike backwards from one side, I don't feel "in control" at all, even on flat ground!

I'll have to admit...the candlestick moment is actually a little bit of a rush(!)~!Awesome!
 

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I have the 10ft black widow and use it to load a road king into a dodge 2500 quad cab long bed p/u. It is plenty long enough to keep from bottoming out the bike. The only problem I have experienced is that the tailgate has a slight indentation from where the tires rolled across the it (no damage to the edges of the tailgate as the ramp is supported across the entire width of the ramp). The first time loading and unloading was a real pucker experience since I wasn't sure if there was going to be a moment of time where I would be suspended in space because my feet would not reach the ramp. This would be when the front tire was on the ramp and the back tire had not reached the bottom yet, but it turned out not to be the case. The last time I used the ramp I loaded the bike at 5am in the dark (not the best plan) but it worked out ok. It's a good idea to have prestaged your tie downs, go ahead and attach your soft ties and have someone available to assist in handing you the straps.

All in all it's been a good experience and the company is great to work with.
 

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just another thought on tailgates-I have an s10 zr2, and got a recall notice on the tailgate straps breaking, sure enough one snapped on me just dropping the tailgate down to fast, I have had my Rk sitting on that tailgate with a ramp many times could have gotten ugly quick! I think in the future I will pull the tailgate off and put the ramp right on the bed. I never did it but I think if you unhook the straps, then pull straight out they come right off.

Just something to think about. 800lbs mc+rider weight on 2 cheezy straps=$#$%%@# moment!!!
 

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I load mine w/o the gate all the time (I have to tow a trailer, which means no open gate).
Chevy will replace the straps completely free, BTW.
To remove the gate, open it halfway (to 45 degrees) and unsnap the straps, then lift the right side of the gate pulling it up/out at 45*.
 

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masstch said:
I load mine w/o the gate all the time (I have to tow a trailer, which means no open gate).
Chevy will replace the straps completely free, BTW.
To remove the gate, open it halfway (to 45 degrees) and unsnap the straps, then lift the right side of the gate pulling it up/out at 45*.
thanks, I have been meaning to get the truck in to chevy for the recall, time is always short!
 
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