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Discussion Starter #1
I live in Maryland, where winter temperatures are moderate ( 30F. to 40F. days / 20F. to 30F. nights ).
When I'm not riding, I keep my bike in an enclosed cargo trailer.
That works great in the summer. However, I'm concerned about rust, from condensation, during the winter.
I'm planning to put indoor/outdoor carpet, on the floor, for some insulation, and running an extension cord, from my house, to my battery tender.
What about heat? Electric space heater? Heat lamp? Cost of electric?
Any other tips? Please. :)
 

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EASY DOES IT
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Just ride...it'll dry off...:D
 

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Lee, word of caution with the trailer, chain it down with something a bolt cutter can't go through...Better yet, park it in the garage. Not too many will enter a locked door of a garage, but the trailer is something either taken whole, or an opening through the side wall. It is easier than busting the lock.

Thorns
 

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I haven't seen your bird.
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I store my bike in an underground garage that never freezes, but if you can't do that, remove the battery from the bike, bring it inside and hook it up to the battery tender in a place that won't expose the battery to freezing temperatures. Forget about the electric space heater or heat lamp. Save yourself some money needlessly spent. Besides, it probably would just add to any worries you have about condensation. And, though you probably have it covered, add some fuel stabilizer and top off the tank, then run the engine long enough to get the stabilized fuel where it needs to go. Just one guy's opinion on winter prep. There are probably several threads on the same subject if you search. Gawd, I hate winter!
 

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Ironbutt
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I have on of these. http://www.harley-davidson.com/gma/gma_product.jsp?PRODUCT<>prd_id=845524441849449.
The key to reducing condensation and rust is proper ventilation. The bubble does the trick. A cheaper solution would be to put a big fan in front of the bike. Forget the carpet, heater, or cover. The bubble is all you need. Take your battery out of the bike and put it inside the house on a tender. The bubble has a tiny little fan that uses very little electric, yet it keeps the air circulating inside and your precious bike stays clean and dry. I may sound like a salesman but i'm not. I have used this product for three winters now and can tell you it works as advertised.
 

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You could move to AZ.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks, guys. :thanks:
I'm going to get a Harley Bubble. It sounds like exactly what I need.
I ride in the winter; but, only a few times each month. The Bubble looks like it's easy in and out for riding.
 

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I would think that after taking the battery inside, putting a trouble light under the bike would give off enough heat to circulate some air. When it gets truely cold, I tend to pull my truck in the garage, and hang a trouble light next to the block. Makes it easier to start in the morning...
 

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If you seal the trailer you can put a couple of these to keep the condensation down. Just don't ignore the dryers. They require maintenance to keep them working.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the additional info, guys.
The GoldenRod, in particular, looks like an inexpensive, low maintenance option.
:thanks:
 

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I live in MA. I put my bike in the trailer with a full tank and stabilizer-crack the roof vent and window--that's it. I charge the bat. once or twice. Last one went 7 yrs.
 

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'04 FXSTDI
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A friend needs to store his Deuce and Buell in a trailer this winter here in KC. Winter temps can vary from high 40s to below zero.
What would you all recommend for storing in a trailer in this climate?
 

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buy yourself an inexpensive refrigerated dehumidifier, they take out ALL moisture and raise the temp a couple of degrees

and btw, i would think that summer in a locked trailer could be as unhealthy as winter for your mo'cyle. more temp variations and more chance of condenstion ...
 

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Ironbutt
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gunnut said:
A friend needs to store his Deuce and Buell in a trailer this winter here in KC. Winter temps can vary from high 40s to below zero.
What would you all recommend for storing in a trailer in this climate?
Storing in a trailer is really no different than in an unheated garage. In fact, the trailer may be better because a concrete floor can be a source of moisture.

A few winters ago i couldn't figure out why i occasionally had severe condensation form on my bike. Finally figured out that it was happening shortly after my wife parked her car in the garage. The hot air coming off the car engine would mix with the cold air in the garage and form condensation on my bike, which sat right next to the car. I bought a Harley bubble and problem solved.

Tell your friend to just just normal storage procedures and not worry about it.
 

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I noticed some pitting spots on my chrome last spring, Found them during the pre-summer riding season clean up. I had to use semi-chrome polish to remove them. My bike is stored in a dry, carpeted, 15 x 21 pole barn with shingled roof. There is adequate ventilation but it still drew moisture and started to pit. This year I am going to put a light coat of oil on all the chrome by rubbing it on with a rag. I don't plan on riding until March, I'm a sissy, too cold. I did this trick for 20 years on my metrics and NEVER had any rust or pitting. Come spring, just lots of hot soapy water, some wax, good to go.
 
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