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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, longtime lurker for the v-twin forum. But very first post.
I ended up making this account about last week to try to get some help with my plan of attack or lack of for some scratches I put into my tank recently.

I was gifted Miguers Ultimate 3 Step Paint Care Car Kit (compound, polish and a wax) about a half a year ago and had decent results with my truck that has white paint but am more worried about the paint on my bike. I am concerned with doing more damage trying to make it better.

I'm not trying to get rid of them completely (I think they are too deep? my nail barely catches on them) but just want to make them a little less noticable if possible, And at this point I am just overthinking everything the more I look into it, so I was just going to try the 3 step system on the tank but wanted to get some feedback first. I am very ignorant when it comes to paint/bodywork.

Like I said before I don't need it to be perfect, it is not a show bike, and was built to ride. But the paint has sentimental value to me. I got the bike from a good mentor of mine. And believe it or not the paint is atleast 13 years old or more.

Also If the 3 step system is okay, should I do the whole tank or tape around the scratches and work just a small area?

Any info would be much appreciated, I am open ears.
Will add photos below. Sorry for the long post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Photos of the tank, these are not the best and I can get more but I grabbed them in a hurry. Edit: as you see depending on the angle and light. they really pop out. And other angles you can hardly see them.
Automotive lighting Gas Tints and shades Bumper Automotive exterior

Fuel tank Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive fuel system Automotive lighting

Vehicle Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Wheel

Automotive lighting Hood Motor vehicle Automotive tire Automotive design

Bicycle tire Bicycle handlebar Automotive lighting Automotive tire Hood

Tire Wheel Automotive lighting Motor vehicle Automotive tire
 

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Honda spray cleaner and wax another is Turtle Wax ICE which is pricey last I bought was $16. I had a tailight that was brought back to new condition with one application. The Honda cleaner works best for black painted surfaces.imo
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Honda spray cleaner and wax another is Turtle Wax ICE which is pricey last I bought was $16. I had a tailight that was brought back to new condition with one application. The Honda cleaner works best for black painted surfaces.imo
I am a religious user of the bike spirits originals spray cleaner and polish, I have heard it is the same as the Honda spray cleaner, not 100% sure.
That was the first thing I went to when I put the scratches in. Sadly they are too deep for it to do anything. I'm pretty certain I went past the clear. And I think that's part of the issue. The rest of the paint looks so good that the scratches stick out like a sore thumb.. even my lady saw them and was like ...damn

I can look into the turtle wax ice
 

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If you are going to do it, do it right. If you don't have the skill or nerves, (It's really hard to sand a paint job for beginners) go to your local body shop that has PROFESSIONALS and let them do it.
I would start with 800 grit and wet sand it all the while using a finer grit until you get to 3000 grit. Then you use the 3M system to polish it to a glass finish. If your through the clear then your probably better off with the body shop.
 

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I must be getting old. The paint belonged to a mentor of yours is how I read this. Did it arrive to live with you (bikes just live with us, we are but caretakers) with 100% absolutely perfect paint? I have a few old bikes (4) all of which have had "custom" paint applied over the years. Some of these paintjobs are decades old. The rule of thumb that I live by (other opinions may vary), is that if it's not bad enough to repaint, I wax over it. Nicks, chips, scratches, and other scars are part of the personality of the bike. They are "Battle Scars", proof that the bike is actually ridden in the real world, and not a trailer queen, or a work of art. If your' bike is a work of art, seek out a true professional to help you. Home repairs to paint have a way of often looking much worse than the scars that they were intended to repair. Just my 2 cents worth, best of luck, whatever you decide to do! Regards, Dean
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I must be getting old. The paint belonged to a mentor of yours is how I read this. Did it arrive to live with you (bikes just live with us, we are but caretakers) with 100% absolutely perfect paint? I have a few old bikes (4) all of which have had "custom" paint applied over the years. Some of these paintjobs are decades old. The rule of thumb that I live by (other opinions may vary), is that if it's not bad enough to repaint, I wax over it. Nicks, chips, scratches, and other scars are part of the personality of the bike. They are "Battle Scars", proof that the bike is actually ridden in the real world, and not a trailer queen, or a work of art. If your' bike is a work of art, seek out a true professional to help you. Home repairs to paint have a way of often looking much worse than the scars that they were intended to repair. Just my 2 cents worth, best of luck, whatever you decide to do! Regards, Dean
When the bike came to me it was not 100% flawless on the paint, however it is still beautiful. Not a show bike by any means, the bike was built to ride and I do just that.

I was just bummed because these battle scars as you say were from faults of my own and my goal was to just make them blend in more and less noticable.

but as a follow up to everyone who responded. I ended up hitting the scratches with a compound , polish and wax, I will do it once more this weekend. It made it less noticable but I'm able to tell now that I would need to do some touch up paint and clear if I want it 100% fixed. And that is not in my skill set, and will probably end up leaving it as is. I will snag some follow up photos this weekend.
 

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The one person who can see those scratches is you others don't notice it as they walk by. I had my 00 Silverado repainted there is a bit of over spray on the right mirror. No one sees it, but me. They just get in and start fiddling with the ac controls. To you it sticks out like a sore thumb to others it's a split nail.
 

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When the bike came to me it was not 100% flawless on the paint, however it is still beautiful. Not a show bike by any means, the bike was built to ride and I do just that.

I was just bummed because these battle scars as you say were from faults of my own and my goal was to just make them blend in more and less noticable.

but as a follow up to everyone who responded. I ended up hitting the scratches with a compound , polish and wax, I will do it once more this weekend. It made it less noticable but I'm able to tell now that I would need to do some touch up paint and clear if I want it 100% fixed. And that is not in my skill set, and will probably end up leaving it as is. I will snag some follow up photos this weekend.
The one person who can see those scratches is you others don't notice it as they walk by. I had my 00 Silverado repainted there is a bit of over spray on the right mirror. No one sees it, but me. They just get in and start fiddling with the ac controls. To you it sticks out like a sore thumb to others it's a split nail.
Firstly, congratulations on having attempted a repair without causing further damage. As you said this was a 'mentor's" bike, I thought perhaps it was wise to use great caution here, as bikes like this carry many personal and emotional attachments with them. I was pretty damn sure that you didn't want to repaint this bike, for any reason. Yes, judging by your' photos, your' bike is still beautiful, and it likely will remain beautiful for a very long time to come. I can understand that you were/are bummed about the scratch, none of us likes scars, on our bikes, or on ourselves or our loved ones. But, scars are a part of life, over time, there is no avoiding them.
As Captainhook455 said, this scar is most noticeable to you. I don't understand the reasoning that the human mind compels our eyes to go directly to these flaws, but I know that it does. Only those that don't really care can ignore them. The rest of us are uneasy about them, and see them immediately upon looking at the paint. The nicks, chips, gouges, and scratches in my bikes draw my eyes too Eventually, we learn to live with them, and sometimes they eventually become reminders of people, places, and events in our lives.
Glad to hear you did have good luck in your' attempt at repair. That's a pretty bike, and I hope that you are able to enjoy it for many years to come.
Best regards, Dean
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The one person who can see those scratches is you others don't notice it as they walk by. I had my 00 Silverado repainted there is a bit of over spray on the right mirror. No one sees it, but me. They just get in and start fiddling with the ac controls. To you it sticks out like a sore thumb to others it's a split nail.
Firstly, congratulations on having attempted a repair without causing further damage. As you said this was a 'mentor's" bike, I thought perhaps it was wise to use great caution here, as bikes like this carry many personal and emotional attachments with them. I was pretty damn sure that you didn't want to repaint this bike, for any reason. Yes, judging by your' photos, your' bike is still beautiful, and it likely will remain beautiful for a very long time to come. I can understand that you were/are bummed about the scratch, none of us likes scars, on our bikes, or on ourselves or our loved ones. But, scars are a part of life, over time, there is no avoiding them.
As Captainhook455 said, this scar is most noticeable to you. I don't understand the reasoning that the human mind compels our eyes to go directly to these flaws, but I know that it does. Only those that don't really care can ignore them. The rest of us are uneasy about them, and see them immediately upon looking at the paint. The nicks, chips, gouges, and scratches in my bikes draw my eyes too Eventually, we learn to live with them, and sometimes they eventually become reminders of people, places, and events in our lives.
Glad to hear you did have good luck in your' attempt at repair. That's a pretty bike, and I hope that you are able to enjoy it for many years to come.
Best regards, Dean
You are both right. After getting back on the saddle and putting more miles down, My mind is much more at ease. They are definitely part of the bike and it's story now.

The part about how our minds go straight to the flaws and they grow with us and we learn to live with them, is advice that I can not only use with my love of motorcycles but in every day life.

Thank you both for for the kind words and everyone who responded for the help. And as promised some the before and after photos.
 

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You are both right. After getting back on the saddle and putting more miles down, My mind is much more at ease. They are definitely part of the bike and it's story now.

The part about how our minds go straight to the flaws and they grow with us and we learn to live with them, is advice that I can not only use with my love of motorcycles but in every day life.

Thank you both for for the kind words and everyone who responded for the help. And as promised some the before and after photos.
A fine tip black permanent marker can work wonders. You only have to touch it up once in a while.
 
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