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Giving real serious thought to attending the Harley Wrench/Management Course after I retire from the military, anyone heard anything about this school?
 

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I have a friend that just got a full ride to go down there. He leaves in a couple weeks for his first class. He is thrilled. Only thing i know is it supposed to be designed so that you can work and go to school. I am sure I will hear about it at his first break. I can post more info then.
 

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Haven't dealt with it or know anyone who has.

But if you are giving serious thought to it, I say go for it. Back in 1990, company I worked for went under. I almost went to H-D school to be mechanic. Thought long and hard about it but since we had house, kids in school, and wife had decent job(which she lost few years later), we decided to do the 'sensible/responsible' thing and I didn't go. I have regretted it ever since.
 

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My wife starts nursing school full time in Sept. Wonder if I could get her to change her mind and go to this one? Kind of a toss up which I'll need worse down the road: a good wrench or a good looking nurse.
 

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dave51 said:
Kind of a toss up which I'll need worse down the road: a good wrench or a good looking nurse.
Yep, definitely a toss-up.....bike mechanics are charging a premium and nursing is one field that needs bunches of people because we're all living longer.
 

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Dave,

Send your wife to both. As a nurse she can work 12 hour shifts on the weekends and get nearly a full weeks pay. On the weekdays she can work at a H-D dealer as a mechanic. Think she might go for that?
 

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Have a buddy who graduated from there. Don't recall him saying anything particularily good or bad about the curriculum. He did comment that he couldn't find a job anywhere for more than $10/hour. He ended up getting a job as a forest ranger. Ironically, he has a nursing degree and has worked in that field for about 12 years - and hated it.

You might want to research what a typical salary might be if you plan on making a living wrenching.
 

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Good points, maj. No reason to get training for something you can't make a living at. Of course, could always open an indy shop.

I have friend who was forest ranger. He eventually hated it because he hated paperwork. He would spend 3 days in field and have to spend 4 -5 days filling out all the paperwork. He finally opened up his own river rafting company in Tennessee.
 

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Kampnnut, I followed your advice and suggested she do both. The response was less than cordial. Looks like I'm going to be unexpectedly visiting Florida so could you provide me with your home address? I don't need a lot of room...breakfast in bed would be nice.
 

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American Motocycle Institute (AMI)

Just following up to the inquiry posted awhile back.

I'm also retiring soon from the military (and have the GI bill) and am wondering if anyone has attended or heard anything about AMI?
 

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MMI/AMI graduates typically earn $12-$14/hour to start which, in some areas, will not even meet the cost of living. In your first job at a dealership, you'll spend a considerable amount of time doing oil and tire changes before your employer will allow you to "graduate" to new bike prep and accessory installation. Don't expect to be doing engine work and building high-dollar customs right out of school.

If you're serious about making a career with motorcycles, use your GI Bill to go to a 4-year college and get a business degree. It will help prepare you for owning your own shop. You can always take a part-time position with the local dealer as an apprentice to see if that's REALLY what you want to do.
 

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training does not mean experience. even after a training course is completed chances are any position you take would be entry level until you have proven yourself. passing school doesnt guarentee you a high paying job. we have a highly accredited automotive course in our town sponsored by domestic and foreign manufacturers. i have met very few technicians who have come out of it who are worthy of more than entry level positions.
 

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KBOlsen makes a good point for all you military guys, but instead of waiting till you get out get your 4 year degree while you're still in. Tuition assistance pays for it all and you can save your GI Bill for Masters, Phd ect... Whith all your military training you're probably almost there anyhow. You'll have alot more opportunities for high paying jobs when you get out. Sorry, I have to get off that soapbox again:)
 

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Wouldnt have minded doin a little
wrenchin myself. But the pay seems
to low for the training etc they want.

I decided to wrench on my own bike
and enjoy ridin.

Went to school for Civil Engineering
while working at the local city as
a ditch digger. Spent about 5 years
workin my way up until I finally
got into civil construction inspections.

Pays the bills and still have time
for my love of bikes etc.

Dont jump into anything too quick....
its never in real life like you
imagine it is. Not to mention you
may just ruin a perfectly good hobby
by having to work around it everyday.

JMHO
 

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I'm considering sending my oldest son there, so I have spoken with a few folks who have attended...they all said good things about it. I'll be checking into it a little more in the next year or so, as the time for him to go gets a little closer!! :)
 

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Not too concerned about the pay, but how is the school?

I already have a bachelors degree in business and a Masters (thanks to Uncle Sam). This is just something to do after I retire in less than 4 years.

Anyone attended the AMI school? If so, how was it? Do you learn a lot? Are the graduates knowledgable on Harleys?

I figure if my GI bill will pay for it I'll go for the heck of it and learn about my bike (hopefully inside and out).

I appreciate all of your advice!
 

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we had a kid in here a while back that graduated from AMI and was very pleased with the course.
i think zadok said it best...it isnt what you think when its a job. i wrenched for 16 years after graduating from an automotive college program and it was a job. i did work on my own vehicles also but there wasnt anything romantic about working on my own stuff after i fixed other peoples all day. just cause you like working on your own bike doesnt mean youll like working for someone else on other peoples bikes. although from what ive seen it would do some people good just to see what its really about. until youve been in a position like that you dont really appreciate what its like to be on the other side.
 

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Thanks for the info.... Great website. I didn't realize that there were 2 motorcycle schools in Florida... Motorcycle Mechanics Institute (MMI) in Orlando and the American Motorcycle Institute (AMI) in Daytona. The website addresses the ciriculum at MMI. Thanks.
 

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compare the curriculum and the facitlites between MMI in Orlando and AMI in Daytona. Just as with their respective marine repair courses, AMI training is better and cheaper for the hobbiest. Go to MMI with their more complete courses and factory sponsorship if you are interested in a career.
 
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