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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I set up my cones for the Offset Cone Weave practice. (set up correctly this time, Harris). I'm tellin' ya, this is really pushing my envelope. My first trips through the cones was with 2,000+ rpms and dragging the brake. It wasn't really all that hard to make it through the cones this way because I feel more confident in being able to let off the brake to right the motor instead of using clutch control. It seems to come naturally. With that brake-control confidence, I made it through the cones like 4 or 5 times in a row, heating up my brakes each time. Now, I gotta work on that clutch and throttle control.

Stage Two (no brakes): I made several runs looping around the 0' and 22' cones instead of through the gates . . no brakes and with concentration on throttle control and "head and eyes". It was relatively easy. The rest of the day woulod be NO BRAKES!

Stage Three (through the even-numbered gates, only): After about 20 minutes of successful warm-up with stages one and two, I began a few runs going through the gates on one side and completely around them on the other side. Occasionally, I'd be in such good shape that I'd go through some of the gates on both sides. I need to push myself now, to do the exercise as prescribed.

Stage Four (as Harris instructs): O.K. now for the real thing. Back and forth, back and forth through the course, trying with all my might to get just one perfect run in a row. Came close several times; but it seemed impossible. Somewhere I'd lose concentration or something and have to pull out and go around a gate.
Finally, I accomplished a perfect run. It was well over an hour into this pracitce session. Now the goal would be try for back to back perfect runs. Another hour later, still no back-to-back perfect runs. It was frustrating. I'd do one run absolutely perfectly and then miss a gate or hit a cone on the way back in the other direction.

Judy showed up. I asked her to video an attpemt. Unfortunately, I missed one of the gates (Gate #5) for the video. I wanted it to be perfect.

Video: http://callairco.com/ken/OffsetConeweave1.wmv

Judy left. My next four runs in a row were perfect! I mean absolutely perfect. Everything came together! Head and eyes, rhythm, clutch, no brake . . . . . everything! I stayed another 45 minutes practicing back and forth, back and forth. Had several simultaneous perfect runs. This IS possible! In fact, the frequency of perfect runs increased along with my confidence. Increased confidence let me concentrate on looking up the course instead of at cones.

Oh, I tried some figure 8's today. Guess what! No brake dragging! Both feet firmly planted on the floorboards for every maneuver today except for the warm-up. This is really a lot easier on the motor, brakes, and clutch. My oil temp never exceeded about 250 degrees or so all day!

I'm pretty happy with my progress today; feel much more in control of my bike and very happy that I'm easier on my equipment.

Ken
 

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2005 Road King Classic
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Verrrry nice!
 
G

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Ken,

Looks and sounds great.

It's hard for me to tell from the video, but I think you may benefit from looking further ahead. Instead of looking at the next gate, look across it. For example, as you're entering gate 1, instead of looking at gate two, look all the way ahead over gate 4. As you reach gate 2, you should have shifted to gate 5, and so on.

Also remember to be looking at your entire proposed route, rather than snapping from gate to gate. Imagine another rider going through gate 4 as you go through gate 1, and follow his progress, as you proceed.

Again your RPM's sound great. Very steady, and not high at all.

Also, your motor placement is excellent. You use the full width of the gates. Often people only get the front wheel to about the middle of the gate. With the motor leaned, this will cause the saddlebag to knock a cone.

Harris
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I forgot to mention:

My engine runs much, much cooler when I don't drag the rear brake. If I used the brake at all, I'm sure I was over-using it well beyond any necessity to control the power to the ground. It's so much easier to do the maneuvers controlling engine power to the ground with the rear brake; a habit I'm working hard to eliminate.

The only way I was able to progress to this new level was to have that right foot firmly flat on the floorboard. If I started through the course with my foot simply touching the brake pad, I found myself braking more and more heavily through each of the cones, reverting back to my old habits.

What was really neato was after about 45 minutes of intense practice, I got off the motor and touched my rear brake rotor. That would usually result in burned fingers. Not this time! The rotor was only barely above ambient . . probably heated from the final stop to rest for a minute.

The other noticeable parameter was that my engine oil never rose about about 250 - 260! During all previous practice sessions, the needle was pushing up near 300 degrees! I'd have to stop every 20 minutes or so to let the motor, clutch, and brake cool back down.

This is all pretty exciting to me. Can't wait til Saturday to practice some more cone weaving.

Ken
 
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