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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been seriously thinking about converting my 03 FLSTFI to 95" myself. Not because I wanted to save money, but because I like to take things apart & see how they work.

After reading through the shop manual it really doesn't seem all that difficult so I put together a list of tools that I think I'll need to purchase. For the top end, the shop manual says that I will need the following:
HD-42317-A Piston pin circlip remover/installer
HD-42320-A Piston Pin Remover
HD-42322 Piston Support Plate
HD-95952-1 Threaded Cylinders
HD-95952-33C Connecting Rod Clamping Tool
HD-96333-51D Piston Ring Compressor
HD-96333-103 Ring Compressor Band

I am also planning on converting over to gear drive cams & will need to get the following tools for the bottom end:
HD-33443 Oil pump alignment screws
HD-43644 Camshaft Remover & Installer
HD-42314 Cam/Crank Gear Lock
HD-42325 Camshaft Needle Bearing remover/installer

After searching the forum I have been able to locate all of the tools I'll need to do the cams @ Georges Garage. However, I can't seem to locate any of the tools that I'll need to do the top end. Does anyone know where I can get these tools?

Also, the Threaded Rods (actually part of the connecting rod clamping tool) seem like the may not really be necessary. The shop manual says to use the rods to keep the 1st cylinder in place while rotating the engine to work on the 2nd cylinder. Seems to me that I could just place a couple of washers/nuts on the studs & get the same results without have to purchase another expensive tool. Am I heading in the right direction, or should I just get the tool?
 

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HD-42317-A Piston pin circlip remover/installer - I used a scribe and a couple of small screwdrivers

HD-42320-A Piston Pin Remover - just tapped mine out, this link shows how to
make an inexpensive pin puller and ring compressor http://www.harleyhog.co.uk/1550/bbonline.htm

HD-42322 Piston Support Plate - a couple blocks of wood work fine

HD-95952-1 Threaded Cylinders
HD-95952-33C Connecting Rod Clamping Tool I didn't need these. I just had my son hold down on the cylinder when I rotated the engine.

The guy that bored my cylinders put a taper on the bottom inside of them and I was able to squeeze the rings with my fingers and slide the piston into the cylinder without a compressor.

Get some rubber tubing (1/2" ID I think) to slide over your cylinder studs to protect them and your pistons.

Just my 2 cents but it worked for me.
 

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by the way, few of those tools are absolutely necessary but some of them certainly do make the job go easier/smoother(the piston pin circlip tool for instance)

~John
 

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*I used a scribe (awl) to pluck the wrist pin circlips, and a pair of needle nose pliers to grab and remove. No fighting.
*I'm a plumber, so I will use a wide band pipe clamp for ring compressor (No-Hub clamp).
*1 Used rubber washing machine hose cut into 6" pieces works great for protecting the cylinder studs.
 

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To get the cams out I put in oven and tapped out with socket. Plan doing that to put back in, putting cams in freezer. Check out Harley hog site. One one intalling 1550 and another on changing out cams. Walks you through pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info guys. It sounds like I can do the top end w/o any fancy tools & the cams with just a few.

I talked to the dealer this morning about pressing the old cam bearings out & new ones & he said he'd do it for about $30. So I can't see why I would buy any tools for that part of the job.

Looks like all I'll need to buy is the Oil pump alignment screws, Cam/Crank Gear Lock, Camshaft Needle Bearing remover/installer as well as a good torque (in/lb) wrench and a few adapters. All in all I think it will end up costing me a few dollars more to do this myself, but as I said before it isn't about the money.
 

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Don't need to buy anything to lock cam chain or to pull back tensioners. For tensioners I just grabed them with vice grips your not reusing them.

As for chain I shoved a piece of plastic about 1"x1" from old snowmobile slide. Chunk of wood would probably work or rag. Just need to stop it frm moving. Could probably grab it with a pair of channel locks.
 

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ovanay elinquentday
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You don't need a piston support plate if you feed the pistons into the jugs before you put the jugs back on the case. You just leave the bottom of the piston out far enough to slide the wrist pin through. Put a clip on one side of the piston before you load it in the jug, then when you get the wrist pin in, insert the opposite side clip.

I used the alignment pins because I had them, but you don't need them. Just loosely snug the fuel pump bolts and rotate the engine by turning the rear wheel. The pump will self center and you can snug down the bolts. It's the same procedure as if you had used the pins.

If you leave the bike in gear and block the rear wheel, it will let you break the bolts loose for the gears on the cam drive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
More good ideas.

GPO03FatBoy - it's funny you mentioned installing the pistons into the jugs first. I was just reviewing HH's website & he did the same thing. One thing that concerns me a little is if you don't insert the piston exactly right, you will have to "spin" it in the jug so that you can insert the wrist pins. Couldn't that cause the rings to scratch the cylinder walls?
 

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ovanay elinquentday
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nodoze said:
More good ideas.

GPO03FatBoy - it's funny you mentioned installing the pistons into the jugs first. I was just reviewing HH's website & he did the same thing. One thing that concerns me a little is if you don't insert the piston exactly right, you will have to "spin" it in the jug so that you can insert the wrist pins. Couldn't that cause the rings to scratch the cylinder walls?
The idea is to line up the pistons in the jugs in the same orientation that they will be when on the bike, and seat them just beyond the rings. (There won't be a lot of spce between the rings and wrist pin hole, but there will be enough. The lube that you use to insert the pistons will be enough to handle the couple of degrees of rotation that you may get when you square up with the rod. Once the pins and clips are in, you simply push the jug down and seat it. (Be sure your base o-ring is already in place.)

Also, I used Springer's idea and cut a couple of pieces of hose an inch or so shorter than the cylinder studs and split the hose pieces up the side. The hose sections will make a good base to work on as you are inserting the pins and clips, and once everything is set you can simply pull them off and push the jug down. It may have been overkill, but I also kept foam pipe insulation sections around the rods, to keep them from clanking against the sides of the case until I was ready to line each rod up with its piston and insert the pin.
 

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One more tip. If you haven't gotten your parts yet talk to HDWrench(Steve at GMR performance) he's a great guy to deal with. He's an advertiser here and also really knows his stuff. He can hook you up with parts and more useful advise than you can absorb. He also rents the tools you need for this job.

Joe
 

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I would purchase the 1/2" and 7/16" dog bone wrenches (torque adapters). These can be purchased at McMaster Carr at a reasonable price. They don't cost that much and they make it easy to torque the hard to get at bolts on the back cylinder. Also a 3/16 inch ball end allen wrench will save you time taking off your lifter covers.
 

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Rent the cam tools from Steve (i.e. HDWRENCH) at GMR Performance.

I would get the dog bone adapters as well for the rocker boxes. All the other tips the guys suggested are perfect and all you need. It looks like rocket science but it's really not much different than wrenching on autos. I WOULD REALLY SUGGEST that you get a Sear's Craftsman 40 piece rethreading set (sears part number 52105). Cost about $50 bucks. It will clean the crap out of the bolt holes and off the bolts. DON'T USE A TAP AND DIE SET.

Get a couple of tubes each of Red and Blue Loctite and you'll be in business.

Don't forget to take pictures with a digital camera as you tear down in case you have to refer back to them later.

Good luck!
 

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rpbrock said:
Rent the cam tools from Steve (i.e. HDWRENCH) at GMR Performance.

I would get the dog bone adapters as well for the rocker boxes. All the other tips the guys suggested are perfect and all you need. It looks like rocket science but it's really not much different than wrenching on autos. I WOULD REALLY SUGGEST that you get a Sear's Craftsman 40 piece rethreading set (sears part number 52105). Cost about $50 bucks. It will clean the crap out of the bolt holes and off the bolts. DON'T USE A TAP AND DIE SET.

Get a couple of tubes each of Red and Blue Loctite and you'll be in business.

Don't forget to take pictures with a digital camera as you tear down in case you have to refer back to them later.

Good luck!
and a box of ziplock bags and a marker!
 

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the 1/2 and 7/16 torque adapters in Mcmaster are about $12 or 13, a piece, in the catalog I looked in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
All good ideas. Once I get the scratch together I definately be talking to either Bean, Dewey or GMR (I just haven't made up my mind yet).

But as far as tearing down & re-assembling I'm convinced that it's something I can handle & thanks to you're tool ideas it looks like I might actually save a few bucks.

Thanks again guys!
 
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