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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2016 stock Tri Glide with 80,000 miles on it. Conservative rider. Getting worried about the cam tensioners and cannot really any definitive info on their life. Will have them changed out shortly. What else should be checked/changed out at the same time?
 

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My 2015 Ultra Classic had some moderate burnishing on the tappet rollers @ less than 10,000 miles. I'd take a look at them.
 

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Oil pump checked, crank runout checked, lifters changed. Based on the visual and measurements make changes as needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the info.
Local Harley dealer quotes $1030 for replacement rods/cam chain tensioners/labor
Why do rods need to be replaced/changed to adjustable?
 

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Thanks for the info.
Local Harley dealer quotes $1030 for replacement rods/cam chain tensioners/labor
Why do rods need to be replaced/changed to adjustable?
Replace the pushrods with adjustable so they don't have to go through the top. Costs more to go through the top. Have them check the primary tensioner shoe too
 

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Local Harley dealer quotes $1030 for replacement rods/cam chain tensioners/labor
How else do you think they are going to pay the rent and upkeep on their Harley Davidson Boutique?

If you can't or just plain don't want to do this yourself, there should be some independent shop that would do it for a lot less.

Before parting with that kind of pocket change, I would pop off the cam cover to put eyes on the tensioners. The primary is easy to see. Secondary a little more difficult as it's on the back side of the cam plate. A small dental mirror helps. You might find out that you don't have hardly any wear and are just worried about nothing. It's kind of like checking the oil in your car; finding it is low; and having someone redo the top end.

And if you don't like strange new noises coming out of your motor, don't start putting non-stock parts in it. The MoCo probably spent more R&D money covering up or eliminating mechanical motor noises than anything else.

You don't have to be a master mechanic to work on your own bike. Your first investment should have been the Factory Service Manual for your bike (trike). Even if you don't do the work yourself, it makes for great reading when you're spending that quality time on the throne every morning. Knowledge is power. It could keep you from just swallowing whatever they are feeding you. You might even find out that these bikes aren't that hard to work on.
 
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