V-Twin Forum banner
201 - 220 of 222 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Understood Joe. Thanks anyhow. I'm going to continue enjoying your efforts, and riding my un-restored '85. I'd have to buy another bike to ride if I wanted to put mine though the process your doing. I'm 72 and not about to just stop riding while restoring The Moonraker.
Carry On..!! You're doing great.
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #202 ·
Thanks, @guido4198 I am fortunate to have collected four other bikes over the years so I have choices.

I went to a swap meet Sunday and came home with this 16" front wheel for $75. From what I understand the spokes are polished stainless. I will disassemble it and after blasting the spokes, lace it to my rear hub. Sound good?

Unfortunately there were no good 19" wheels or rims to be found, so I ordered Buchanan SS spokes for the Dixie rim that I have.

Wheel Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread
 
  • Like
Reactions: V-STRUM

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
If the spokes are stainless, why would you need to blast them? Can you not just use some stainless polish on them? They look fairly clean from the picture. What would you use to blast them with?
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #204 ·
If the spokes are stainless, why would you need to blast them? Can you not just use some stainless polish on them? They look fairly clean from the picture. What would you use to blast them with?
Original spokes were zinc plated, and had a satin finish. Bead blasting the polished stainless gives them an OEM look, but with corrosion resistance. It's a visual thing, that's all.
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #206 ·
I re-read the judging guidelines and asked the AMCA for a clarification on using stainless spokes on newer bikes. This is what it says:

8. American motorcycles from 1930 to approximately 1970
used cad spokes, simulated by glass beaded stainless
steel. An exception was parkerized spokes during war
years.
9. Japanese and American motorcycles after the early
1970s used bright zinc plating.
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #208 ·
Using stainless so they don't get rusty in a year.
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #209 ·
The AMCA responded to my inquiry on using stainless spokes instead of original zinc plated. This is what they said:

Hello Joe,

Thanks for your inquiry regarding the plating requirements for later model Harley's, 1970's and up. The judging committee stated for bikes that would have left the factory as "original" having zinc plated spokes, they should be replated in zinc or purchase OEM zinc spokes if available.

The reason this is different from what is allowed for cadmium plating is that cadmium plating is illegal in some regions of the world. Zinc plating is readily available. Also, please remember that the spokes themselves must still be the same shape and form as the original.

Sincerely,

Dan


So I have to decide between points deduction and plating all those spokes. I don't know if my home plating kit would do a good enough job. I can practice on an some old spokes and see what happens, I guess.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,424 Posts
You made a good inquiry to the amca. And yes, now you have to decide. From the things we have seen you do to bring this bike back to superb condition, I'm sure you will make the right choice without anybody telling you what to do. :)
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #211 · (Edited)
They deduct a full point for incorrect spokes and nipples - stainless makes it worse. Marred plating would be ¼ to ½ point deduction, but only the one wheel.
Spokes & Nipples
Incorrect Spokes ½
Incorrect Spoke Nipples ½
Incorrect Lacing ¾
Polished Stainless Steel when should
be Cadmium or Glass Blasted ¼

A guy on another forum had an OEM 19" rim in excellent condition, and I spent some time cleaning and polishing it and the take-off 16" front wheel I got at the swap meet. First I mounted the front hub with bearings and rotated it against some 1200 grit paper to get a factory finish. Then I painted it with adhesion promoter and clear paint, so it should stay nice.



I mounted the axle with some spacers in my vice and tried to measure free play. As it turned out my quick and dirty check last month was correct - Zero Play!!! I will have to buy a longer spacer. I don't know how the previous owner got away with that, and I'll never go to the shop he used!



There was some rust inside under the rim strips, so I cleaned and treated that. Then gave them both a good polishing with a buffing wheel on my drill. Spoked wheels are a lot easier to clean without the spokes, haha.



The swap meet wheel has this sticker with a 1980 part number, so I'm guessing it belongs on my bike too?



I was hoping the OEM spokes were stainless, but they are not. The nipples are different too. They clean up OK, but the first few I cleaned up have some dark spots that may be noticeable when the wheel is assembled.



I don't know if you can see in the picture but the OEM spokes have a curved triangle stamped in the heads, where the Buchanan ones have a raised B. If I go with them, and I could reproduce the stamper, I could grind off the B's and press the correct marking on them. I could grind off the B's anyway, and just polish them.

OR - I could get away with these zinc spokes, buy OEM zinc spokes for the front wheel and return the stainless ones. Back to my spoke conundrum.

edit:
I found 20 NOS OEM spokes for the front wheel on eBay, so I snagged them. I found the other 20 but the part number is slightly different, and no pictures. I asked for some clarification before buying them.

I think zinc spokes will be OK on this bike, it will be well cared for. I have to keep reminding myself it's supposed to be as original, no improvements!
 
  • Like
Reactions: V-STRUM

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
They deduct a full point for incorrect spokes and nipples - stainless makes it worse. Marred plating would be ¼ to ½ point deduction, but only the one wheel.
Spokes & Nipples
Incorrect Spokes ½
Incorrect Spoke Nipples ½
Incorrect Lacing ¾
Polished Stainless Steel when should
be Cadmium or Glass Blasted ¼

A guy on another forum had an OEM 19" rim in excellent condition, and I spent some time cleaning and polishing it and the take-off 16" front wheel I got at the swap meet. First I mounted the front hub with bearings and rotated it against some 1200 grit paper to get a factory finish. Then I painted it with adhesion promoter and clear paint, so it should stay nice.



I mounted the axle with some spacers in my vice and tried to measure free play. As it turned out my quick and dirty check last month was correct - Zero Play!!! I will have to buy a longer spacer. I don't know how the previous owner got away with that, and I'll never go to the shop he used!



There was some rust inside under the rim strips, so I cleaned and treated that. Then gave them both a good polishing with a buffing wheel on my drill. Spoked wheels are a lot easier to clean without the spokes, haha.



The swap meet wheel has this sticker with a 1980 part number, so I'm guessing it belongs on my bike too?



I was hoping the OEM spokes were stainless, but they are not. The nipples are different too. They clean up OK, but the first few I cleaned up have some dark spots that may be noticeable when the wheel is assembled.



I don't know if you can see in the picture but the OEM spokes have a curved triangle stamped in the heads, where the Buchanan ones have a raised B. If I go with them, and I could reproduce the stamper, I could grind off the B's and press the correct marking on them. I could grind off the B's anyway, and just polish them.

OR - I could get away with these zinc spokes, buy OEM zinc spokes for the front wheel and return the stainless ones. Back to my spoke conundrum.

edit:
I found 20 NOS OEM spokes for the front wheel on eBay, so I snagged them. I found the other 20 but the part number is slightly different, and no pictures. I asked for some clarification before buying them.

I think zinc spokes will be OK on this bike, it will be well cared for. I have to keep reminding myself it's supposed to be as original, no improvements!
Top job mate keep it up
Regards Hoges Australia
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #213 ·
I just got this set of NOS 19" front spokes, correct part number, made in 1999 (1988?). They are shiny, and have the shorter torx head nipples. The short stem spokes will be the same, as are the 16" ones. So my conclusion is to use them all as they came. I think they are supposed to be bright zinc.

Font Folk instrument Wood Metal Art
 
  • Like
Reactions: V-STRUM

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #215 · (Edited)
While waiting for the other set of front spokes I assembled the rear wheel. Timken bearings, powder coated hub, cleaned and polished spokes, nipples and rim, and the correct bearing spacer. The last guy in here shimmed a shorter spacer but the shim rubbed on the bearing and became dish-shaped. $10 to do the job right!



I torqued the axle using the new spacer and un-greased bearings. Clearance came out to 0.005 which is perfect.



First side done according to the book. Paint stirring sticks and 2x2s held the rim exactly in the middle of the hub.



Then the other side and snugged everything for now. I'll true it later after I do the front wheel.



Something I can't explain is this side spokes are supposed to cross their counterparts on the first side, but when I tried that they wouldn't reach the correct holes by a lot. If I oriented them opposite they lined up perfectly. This wheel was originally a front wheel with the newer aluminum hub. I laced it to the old style steel hub from my FXR. When I bought the wheel I checked the online fiche and the spokes on a Road King or Heritage Softail front wheel are the same part number as the rear wheel for my bike, 43241-05, from 2000 up to 2012 which was the date code on the tire. Any ideas?
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #216 ·
Cleaned up the new spokes and laced the front wheel today. Bearings measured 0.010" with the correct spacer.



NOS spoke and nipple sets, some from Japan market



Happy with this wheel too.



I was going to use the axles and my vice to true them, but realized I have a few more wheels in my future so I ordered a real truing stand. My wife will be happy because I can work on the honey-do list for a few days.
 
  • Like
Reactions: V-STRUM

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #218 ·
Yes, I always check the manual and a couple of YouTube videos in this case.

My new stand came in so I spent the last couple days truing the wheels. It took about three hours each, but I got within .010" radial and lateral runout on both. Dropped them off at the bike shop and they will have fresh Dunlop D402s mounted Monday or Tuesday at the latest. Then it'll be a roller!

Crankset Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bicycle tire Wheel


Automotive design Electrical wiring Computer hardware Engineering Gas


Automotive tire Wheel Motor vehicle Bicycle tire Automotive design


Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle Rim Automotive wheel system
 
  • Like
Reactions: V-STRUM

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #219 ·
Got my tires today, mounted the rotors and installed the front wheel:



Back wheel will be tomorrow's job.
 

·
Registered
1982 FXR Shovelhead
Joined
·
344 Posts
Discussion Starter · #220 ·
I had a hard time finding the right bolts for the sprocket, but finally got it done! The rotor bolts were like new so I re-used them after cleaning and zinc plating.



The original was hub powder coated, looks good against all the chrome and shiny zinc.



Some beauty shots:





I am going on some rides the next couple days, so it'll be Sunday before I take it off the lift and really show it off!
 
  • Wow
Reactions: V-STRUM
201 - 220 of 222 Posts
Top