V-Twin Forum banner
1 - 20 of 45 Posts

·
HOGDOG
Joined
·
906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I set down the rules. Every state is different, but here in Karlifornia, here's the plan:

1. Go take the written at the DMV. That will get him a learner's permit, no passengers, no night riding.

2. I enrolled him in the Motorcycle Safety Basic Rider course on the weekend of 4/14/06 for three days. That will satisfy his driving test at the DMV.

3. I am taking him gear shopping at the stealer. Helmet (full face), Jacket, chaps, boots, gloves. He will wear the gear everytime he rides the bike. :yes:

4. He knows how to ride, but is not street savy yet, not that anyone will ever be, but he will ride our Kawasaki KLR650 for awhile on the street until he builds some time.

5. Weekend rides with me only, no commuting until he is ready.

6. Kid likes reading so I handed him a stack of books on Motorcycle Street Riding. :RTFB:

What other suggestions can you offer for a young adult? I know some of you ride with your kids, what tips can you offer?

Thanks,

DOG
 

·
Who, me?
Joined
·
434 Posts
Have him go through Harris' Motorcycle Riding Lessons - do it with him. It'll be the best time you guys ever had and you'll be getting some MAJOR good riding habits under your belt to boot!

Link to Riding Lessons: Riding Lessons

My 2cents.
 

·
Soar like an Eagle
Joined
·
2,570 Posts
Looks to me you are doing a great job. Way to go there Dad. My son is 12 and rides on the back with me quite frequently now. I think he likes it but I do not push him. If he wants to get a bike and ride later I will probably do exactly as you are doing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,593 Posts
I learned from my dad the same way... only two thoughts:

At first ride EVERY day for a little while (if feasible). If you only ride weekends, your body can forget, and it takes longer.

Start off in a parking lot. When he's comfortable, ride around the neighborhood trading off who leads and who follows. That way you can watch him some of the time, and he can watch you some of the time.

It worked for me. I got my license in a week. Took the written on a Monday, and the ridden on that Friday... Riding a bunch everyday (it was my spring break).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Sounds as if you have done a great job already. I too brought my son to a large parking lot at least 10 times before I thought he was ready to try the street. I used a high school parking lot after hours, which was perfect. He took the course and has the gear.

He's 17 and has done great. I still control the keys. And he only rides with me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,217 Posts
He should only ride with you for some time....oh maybe 21!:laugh: Thats what my dad did. I had to ride with him, until I turned 21 or joined the military! Defiant cuss that I was ...Am, I joined the military, then rode everywhere once I arrived permanent duty!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
711 Posts
Good advise above. Here's something a bit different.

If it works for your economically and otherwise, get a small cheap dirt bike, plus all the appropriate safety gear. Let him experience that rough and tumble riding a bit (such as falling off a bike whithout getting hurt). Might make him a better street rider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
My son started riding with me before his 17th birthday. He rode his sportster to school everyday except for rainy days. When he first starting riding, he had to ride with me and he was always in front so I could watch what he did. After the ride, we would sit down and talk about the things he did right as well as wrong. The summer before his 18th birthday we rode from Arizona to Lousiana on a two week trip. I don't have to tell you the dangers of riding, but if you teach responsible riding, you've done all you can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
180 Posts
Make his bike a low rider. Then he doesn't have enough ground clearance to get too agressive and everyone knows a low rider only looks cool if you're cruising slow. :cool:
 

·
Incredible
Joined
·
3,029 Posts
I don't know his experience level, but if this is his first riding experience then I second the parking lot training time. Go out there at nights when its empty and just practice a bit before even going on the road.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
653 Posts
Deucedog,
At 19 kids can be persuaded by peer pressure. You may want to show him some stats and stories on motorcycles and alcohol. They mix like oil and water.-2$en#e-
 

·
ORIGINAL DOOF BABE
Joined
·
3,954 Posts
kayak99 said:
Good advise above. Here's something a bit different.

If it works for your economically and otherwise, get a small cheap dirt bike, plus all the appropriate safety gear. Let him experience that rough and tumble riding a bit (such as falling off a bike whithout getting hurt). Might make him a better street rider.
@gree: I always wish I had been able to start early enough to learn on a dirt bike.
 

·
HOGDOG
Joined
·
906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all of the excellent advice. He just called me from the DMV and he passed his written. He was pretty excited - weren't we all?

I'll get him going on a parking lot with our KLR650 first and see how he handles it. The good news is that he is only two weekends away from taking the safety course and in the past alot of guys I know waited 2 months for an opening.

2 weeks can seem like an eternity to a 19 year old, but he'll have plenty of things to work on before attending the 3 day course.

Keep those tips coming - I emailed him this thread, maybe he'll sign up to the VTwin forum...
 

·
HOGDOG
Joined
·
906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Lady Godiva said:
@gree: I always wish I had been able to start early enough to learn on a dirt bike.
Actually, he did ride on the dirt for awhile, but it certainly couldn't hurt to get him out there again for some more practice...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
deucedog said:
So I set down the rules. Every state is different, but here in Karlifornia, here's the plan:

1. Go take the written at the DMV. That will get him a learner's permit, no passengers, no night riding.

2. I enrolled him in the Motorcycle Safety Basic Rider course on the weekend of 4/14/06 for three days. That will satisfy his driving test at the DMV.

3. I am taking him gear shopping at the stealer. Helmet (full face), Jacket, chaps, boots, gloves. He will wear the gear everytime he rides the bike. :yes:

4. He knows how to ride, but is not street savy yet, not that anyone will ever be, but he will ride our Kawasaki KLR650 for awhile on the street until he builds some time.

5. Weekend rides with me only, no commuting until he is ready.

6. Kid likes reading so I handed him a stack of books on Motorcycle Street Riding. :RTFB:

What other suggestions can you offer for a young adult? I know some of you ride with your kids, what tips can you offer?

Thanks,

DOG
Buy the gear someplace else, the stealers are WAY over priced.
 

·
HOGDOG
Joined
·
906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You are right about the stealers. With respect to the gear - we shop at the lesser of the two kinds of stealers. We shop at the 20% less version, i.e. Hales in Ohio.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
786 Posts
If he really wants to ride make him get a job, if he does not have one already, Get his MSF cert. and license endorsement on his own and buy his own bike, gear, and insurance. If he is motivated he will figure it out on his own. I have found that most, I say most, teenagers have no respect for those things they have not worked hard for and earned on their own.
AP
 

·
HOGDOG
Joined
·
906 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Antonio, in many cases your advice is sound, but for now, getting an education is his full time job. He attends the local university and is pre-med. He'll have plenty of time for jobs later on. I never heard anyone on their deathbed say they should have spent more time at the office!

Before everyone starts reving up their pontification engines about youngsters working part time and going to school at the same time, the good news is that I can afford to send him so he doesn't have to work part time. He needs to stay focused. Stay in school and do well, I'm your partner. Drop out and I am all done, you're on your own. That's my deal.

I am thrilled to be able to reward his hard school work with the motorcycling activities.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,502 Posts
deucedog said:
Antonio, in many cases your advice is sound, but for now, getting an education is his full time job. He attends the local university and is pre-med. He'll have plenty of time for jobs later on. I never heard anyone on their deathbed say they should have spent more time at the office!

Before everyone starts reving up their pontification engines about youngsters working part time and going to school at the same time, the good news is that I can afford to send him so he doesn't have to work part time. He needs to stay focused. Stay in school and do well, I'm your partner. Drop out and I am all done, you're on your own. That's my deal.

I am thrilled to be able to reward his hard school work with the motorcycling activities.
Pre-Med...he has no time for a job, school should be his #1 priority.
I know, I have been there.
You are a good Dad DD:thumbsup:
 
1 - 20 of 45 Posts
Top