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I am getting ready to change my oil for the first time and this is my first Harley. Do you guys think I should run 10w 40 for the winter. I live in Va and the morning temps have been around 30 and it gets about 50 most of the time until a month or so when it will probobly have a run of 30's or 40's. I still do ride, not everyday but I do not "store" my bike for the winter. I will ride unless there is salt or sand on the road.
 

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I agree with the 20W 50 for year round. I ride all year and the scoot sits outside at the office. NO problems starting even with 10.5 to 1 CR.
LOL
 

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Read the owners manual... I believe that 10-40 is recommended when temps are below 40.. I am doing this from memory so I may be wrong at the temp point. But this is for dino oil.I use 15-50 Mobile 1 all year round .
 

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10w40 in winter here in PA. Manuel calls for it. On a 20-30 degree day I still don't see 170 on the oil temp gage on the 16 miles to work. 20w50 would be worse and way too thick on a 20 degree morning start up. Each to their own though.
 

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I don't know about the manual but low temp rating for 20w50 is 10F (-12C).
 

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wyodude said:
I don't know about the manual but low temp rating for 20w50 is 10F (-12C).
Not to be a smart a$$ :harhar:

I ain't riding the oil can. :D

I will follow the manual's recommendations and my own experience in riding year round in PA. 20w50 is too heavy in January and February here. It may be 20-25 degrees in the morning when I leave at 6:00 am or so. I do always reach and sustain 180-200 temp on the way home at 2:00 in the afternoon as I get some ride time then.#@SasF#

I just worry about how quickly it flows at 20 degrees, especially if it sits for a few days because of snow or something. I also worry about not getting it up to temperature and sustaining that temperature to help cook water off.

Set a jug of 20w50 out now, and in early February open her up and pour her.

That is not a pretty site especially when our wear is at startup, and the heat is generated by friction, and that heat gets the oil to flow. :eek:

Also I have the dreaded "forged" pistons and they take FOREVER to warm up enough to expand.

Used to do it in all my cars until I got this turbo, 5w30 year round! And when I boost into 16 and 18 PSI she gets plenty hot.

So I guess it is application specific, and what YOU are comfortable with.

All this is my opinion and what I do, and my reasoning for doing it. Right, wrong, or indifferent :whisper:
 

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O.k. Here's the rule:

Yankee's run 10w-40 in the winter.

The good people south of the Mason Dixon line, including transplanted carpetbagger's run 20w-50 year round.:D
 

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LAF said:
So I guess it is application specific, and what YOU are comfortable with.

All this is my opinion and what I do, and my reasoning for doing it. Right, wrong, or indifferent :whisper:
I respect your opinion and can live with my decisions as well. :beer: :D
 

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Yes you guys south of the Mason have your own rules for sure.

Been waiting on that West Virginia Quarter, heard they released it but had to pull it back when they figured out 2 dimes and a nickel, duct taped together, wont fit in the vending machines :roflback:
 

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LAF said:
Yes you guys south of the Mason have your own rules for sure.

Been waiting on that West Virginia Quarter, heard they released it but had to pull it back when they figured out 2 dimes and a nickel, duct taped together, wont fit in the vending machines :roflback:
West Virginia is one of your Yankee states. It may be below the Mason Dixon line according to the Census Bureau. But they joined your Union in 1863 and ya'll fuked 'em up. Don't blame the South on their fuckedupedness.:D
 

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LAF said:
Yes you guys south of the Mason have your own rules for sure.

Been waiting on that West Virginia Quarter, heard they released it but had to pull it back when they figured out 2 dimes and a nickel, duct taped together, wont fit in the vending machines :roflback:
Laf:

How many West Virginia Quarters you want me to send ya? Course with all the Pa. residents riding in WV, you may have some family already holding them in their pockets.

:beer4u:
 

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xxxflhrci said:
West Virginia is one of your Yankee states. It may be below the Mason Dixon line according to the Census Bureau. But they joined your Union in 1863 and ya'll fuked 'em up. Don't blame the South on their fuckedupedness.:D
xxx:

You may want to brush up on your history.........

:nono:
 

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xxxflhrci said:
Educate me....Didn't WV join the Union in 1863 after Va. joined the Confederacy? Didn't WV have more of it's soldier's fight for the North than the South?

http://www.qsl.net/w5www/civilwarmap.gif
Being from Southern West Virginia, I consider it false that the entire State was union:

1864-1865

The year 1864 in West Virginia's Civil War history is best remembered by the actions of Mason County's John McCausland. During the summer, General McCausland battled Union leader David Hunter in southern Virginia. Hunter led a raid on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad. He was stopped at Lynchburg, but not before destroying much of the town of Lexington. In retaliation, McCausland later rode his cavalry into the town of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and demanded a ransom. When the people refused to pay, McCausland burned the town.
Nationally, 1864 marked the year Confederate cavalry rode to the outskirts of Washington, D.C. After a series of victories in the Shenandoah Valley, Jubal Early's Confederate troops attacked Union positions on Bolivar Heights near Harpers Ferry on July 4. The northern troops were forced to abandon Harpers Ferry for the first time since September 1862. However, following the surrender of Dixon Miles' army, the Union had improved its fortifications overlooking this strategic area. After three days of fighting, the North was able to re-take and hold Harpers Ferry for the remainder of the war. Southern forces later won an important battle at Monocacy Creek in Maryland prior to being stopped at Washington. John McCausland was one of the few Confederate military leaders who could brag that he stood within the city limits of the nation's capital during the Civil War.

As northern control of western Virginia strengthened later in the war, southern military support was found more often in the form of irregulars, troops never mustered into the Confederate service. West Virginia's first governor, Arthur Boreman, considered these irregulars the most serious threat to the new state. West Virginia's most famous band of these guerrillas was McNeill's Rangers, organized in Hardy County. During 1863 and 1864, they wreaked havoc on the B&O Railroad in the Eastern Panhandle, seizing numerous Union supplies. However, on February 21, 1865, the rangers executed their most daring raid. A small group of men rode into Cumberland, Maryland, kidnapped generals Crook and Kelley, and delivered them to General Jubal Early. At the end of the war, McNeill's Rangers surrendered to Union troops under General Rutherford B. Hayes on May 8, one month after Appomattox.


Conclusion

The Civil War has often been referred to as a war of brother against brother and father against son. No other state serves as a better example of this than West Virginia, where there was relatively equal support for the northern and southern causes. Often families were split down the middle over their beliefs on the war. There are many instances of divided loyalties and even of individuals fighting for both sides. During the Battle of Scary Creek, a Confederate soldier supposedly saw his brothers fighting on the other battle lines, decided he was in the wrong place, and changed sides on the spot.

While many historians have traditionally placed the number of Union troops enlisted in West Virginia at a much higher figure than Confederates, more recent studies suggest there were almost as many southern troops as northern. Traditional sources have placed Union strength as high as 36,000 compared to only 7,000 to 10,000 Confederates. At least one recent study has raised the southern number to over 20,000 and lowered the Union figure to about the same. Part of the problem with early studies is they ignored numerous southern sympathizers who fought in militias or as irregulars.

The divisions caused by the Civil War lasted long afterward. These were usually fought out in political arenas but occasionally developed into violence. Military service in the Civil War became a badge of honor, as both Union and Confederate veterans attended reunions and participated in parades well into the twentieth century. West Virginia was the only state to send relatively the same number of Union and Confederate veterans to the Battle of Gettysburg reunion, another symbol of the divided state created by the Civil War.


:cheers:
 

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xxxflhrci said:
West Virginia is one of your Yankee states. It may be below the Mason Dixon line according to the Census Bureau. But they joined your Union in 1863 and ya'll fuked 'em up. Don't blame the South on their fuckedupedness.:D
xxx:

Yes you are correct in the fact WV joined the Union in 1863; but subsequent years easily proved where the devotion of most West Virginians was:

General Jenkins, then, accomplished much for the Confederate fortunes in Western Virginia, both by arduous mountain marches and by raids and forays that served to demoralize the enemy in strategic regions. He was prominent both in the campaign for the Kanawha Valley and in the attempt to destroy the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. By reason of his success, he reached the position of commanding officer of his department. He played a vital part in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and assisted materially in the invasion of Pennsylvania. He was a brilliant, brave, and clement leader, who exemplified the highest ideals of the proverbial Confederate cavalryman.

Now please enlighten me on how WV is any more "fuckuped" than the South you claim to be from.

*TIBS*
 
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